A Blog by Dauphine Press

Cinderella Stamps

Cinderella stamps look like postage stamps, but are not “genuine” as they are not government-issued. They cannot be used as postage, so they are the step-child of real stamps. As such, Cinderellas have a long and colorful history in the world of philately and are sought after by many collectors. On a recent project, we had a chance to create three Cinderellas for a collaborative piece that we designed and printed for Crane & Co. in conjunction with the Smithsonian National Postal Museum for the opening reception of Alphabetilately.

The exhibition (which has been extended until October 29, 2010!) explores 26 topics, each illustrated with a Cinderella created by a different graphic designer, one for each letter of the alphabet. They can be viewed on line here.

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Dauphine’s project featured three Cinderella stamps printed on dry-gummed paper and pinhole-perforated by hand. The Crane & Co. Cinderella depicts a cotton plant, referencing the fact that Crane makes 100% cotton papers. The National Postal Museum’s Cinderella has a global airmail motif, referencing the world of stamps. Dauphine Design’s Cinderella depicts a Savannah Sparrow, a motif we frequently use. The Dauphine and Crane “denominations” combine to make up the year (2008), and the Smithsonian’s stamp is valued at 15 NPMs referring to the Museum’s 15th anniversary.

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Our love of these faux postage stamps dates back to a much earlier project. For several years, Dauphine Press also had a retail stationery store. We taught workshops there, including a class on printing faux postage stamps which we printed on our Vandercook.

Invitation of the Week: Citron

Spring has finally hit everywhere around the country and this week we’re highlighting an invitation from our Dauphine Press custom collection that is the embodiment of spring itself: Citron.

This award-winning design was created by Katrina McHugh and prints in three colors: buttercup, leaf and espresso. On press, we capture a very high level of detail in the lemon branch image which derives from a vintage engraving. The Citron invitation won an International Design Award from How Magazine in 2009.

The Citron invitation sprung from a project we did for the esteemed Paula LeDuc catering in Emeryville, California. Paula wanted a bonbon box as a takeaway for their tastings and events. The company’s identity and stationery was restrained and classic, they had never before used a graphic image on any branded materials. But the lyrical lemon branch image resonated with Paula, and we designed the bonbon box that first introduced the image to their clients. We later developed an invitation for an event Paula le Duc held at Beaulieu Garden which evolved into our Citron wedding invitation.

Inspiration comes from so many unexpected places! We hope your spring brings new inspired ideas to your world.

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Duke Basketball: Designing for the Winning Team

A few months back in the middle of a blizzard, our friend and 3/50 Project founder Cinda Baxter sent us a wonderful new client, Stacey Motley of The Paper Café in Raleigh, North Carolina. Stacey had a project she needed to be designed and printed on the fly for Duke University’s basketball team.

Stacey chose to die cut the invitation in the shape of a basketball. The piece was letterpress printed on double thick Crane Lettra. We did a blind hit of a the basketball texture into the background of the card which gave it added dimension.

Today we send our congratulations out to the Blue Devils on their 2010 NCAA win and also to the Butler Bulldogs for an amazing game last night!

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Mid-Winter Gala Invitation

Dauphine Design was proud to have been asked by the Junior Committee of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco to design and print an invitation for the Mid-Winter Gala on March 11th. The event coincided with the Cartier and America exhibit showing at the Legion of Honor. The invitation design was inspired by the famous Panthère de Cartier. Printed on double thick paper, a variation on the iconic panther image was blind hit (or impressed into the page without using ink). The exhibit was recently extended through May 9, 2010. If you live in the San Francisco Bay Area you should definitely stop in to take a peek at this amazing collection!

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