A Blog by Dauphine Press

Wedding Invitation Wording Guidelines {Part Four, The Couple}

We wanted to kick off the New Year with more Tips & Advice from our design team. We know that so many couples really start focusing on the fine details of wedding planning in January and we’re here to help!

In our Wedding Invitation Wording series, we’ve covered the first of four main areas of your invitation – The Invitation Line. Today, we’re moving on to the most unique portion of the invitation – The Couple. This is the first place that guests look when they receive an invitation in the mail, asking themselves “who is the lucky couple?!

THE COUPLE
Over the years, we have seen many unique ways to display names of brides and grooms. Our best tip here is to let your Invitation Line guide you. If you started down a traditional path, it is best to keep things consistent and go the traditional route for listing your names.

Today we are sharing inspiring options to help you decide on the best solution for your wedding invitations.

TRADITIONAL
The most traditional way to display your names is using your first and middle names. Since most traditionally worded invitations include the names of the bride’s parents, her last name is already listed. In this case, it is suitable to just include the bride’s first and middle names. For the groom’s name, you would list his first, middle and last names and include Mr. at the beginning. Our Magnolia Corners and Occidental wedding invitation suites are perfect examples:

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A contemporary twist on the traditional invitation is to include the last name of the bride and groom, even if the bride’s parents are listed at the top of the invitation. You can see a great example in our Chalk Hill suite, which also includes the groom’s parents names listed below his name.

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The format used on our Chalk Hill invitation is also a great example for traditional same-sex marriages, where the “bride comes first” traditional etiquette isn’t necessary.

MODERN
For the modern wedding invitation, when the couple is hosting, they often choose not to include the parent’s names. In this case, you may want to include any variation of your names – using one or all three – first, middle and last names. Just make sure you do the same for both parties to keep things consistent. Here are a few examples:

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The Calistoga wedding invitation suite displays the first and last names of the couple.

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Our Bloom wedding invitation suite includes the first, middle and last names of both the bride and groom.

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Vreeland wedding invitation lists just the first name of the bride and groom.

CASUAL
When it comes to names, the casual version isn’t too far from the modern version. Here are some of our favorite {and the most fun!} ways to display your names on your wedding invitations:

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We love the use of the belly band on our Monterey invitation. It takes the traditional wording on the invitation {the first and last names of the couple are printed on the invitation} and layers a casual air over the entire invitation with just the “Celebrate with Alicia and Richard” line on the belly band. This letterpress printed band is also very helpful in keeping all the pieces in this suite in one tidy bundle. And, as a bonus, adds a splash of color to the suite.

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One last casual option to consider {well, this could work for any style of wording} is choosing a horizontal format as shown on our Charlotte invitation so that the couple’s names sit side-by-side – a true visual representation of today’s modern union!

With so many options, you really can’t go wrong. You just need to choose the combination that feels right for you and your soon-to-be spouse! If you want advice, or want to run what you’re considering by an expert, feel free to reach out and contact us or one of our exclusive retailers. We would be happy to help you check this to-do off your list!

We’re half way there! Next up are the Time + Place and Additional Details.

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Wedding Invitation Wording Guidelines {Part Three, Casual}

We’re wrapping up our tips for the Invitation Line of your wedding invitation wording. The invitation line can sometimes be tricky since family politics can be involved. We’ve covered the traditional route and the modern route for the invitation line {that’s the line on our invitations that indicates who will be hosting your wedding} and today we are going to cover one more option – casual.

INVITATION LINE – CASUAL
One of our goals in offering a custom design process for creating your wedding invitations was to allow every couple to personalize their stationery so that it truly reflects their personalities. It’s fun to see fun personalities shine through in the more casual designs we help couples create.

Today we’re sharing a collection of our favorite invitations with a casual invitation line. Hopefully, these will provide you with inspiration! A bonus, if your wedding day style is more traditional, you may want to consider one of these options for your rehearsal or brunch invitations.

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Our Roseberry design begins with a gleeful exclamation! This sweet start really sets the tone for this casual wedding.

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There’s something to be said for keeping it simple. Our Vreeland design is a perfect example of simplicity making a big statement. In addition, just using first names of the couple keep things casual.

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The type treatment used on the names of this couple make quite a statement. The day is all about you! So, why not select a script font with all the embellishments to celebrate the new couple like our Lavinia design!

With the three main options for the top portion of your wedding invitation wording, next up we will cover the best ways to display your names and the Time + Place of your wedding; followed by additional details you need to share with your wedding guests.

If you’re ready to finalize your wedding invitation wording and begin the design process, contact us or one our exclusive retailers!

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Wedding Invitation Wording Guidelines {Part One, Traditional}

Recently we shared our best tips and favorite links for addressing your wedding invitations. Taking a step back today, we are giving our advice on one of the first items to check off of your wedding invitation to-do list – the wording! In a series of posts we will discuss a few of the common rules of etiquette along with tips we have learned after years of designing and printing endless variations of wedding stationery.

We know you’ve probably never written an invitation from scratch before, so we wanted to break it down into the different sections to keep things simple. We’ve broken it down to four main sections {and multiple posts}: the invitation line, the couple, time + place and additional details.

INVITATION LINE
The invitation line can be the toughest section for some couples, so we’ll start there. Since there are so many options, we will just be covering traditional wording in this post and will follow-up with more casual and modern options in additional posts.

Traditionally, the invitation line was determined by who was hosting {paying for} the wedding. If the bride’s parents are hosting, their names are listed first. This can be a sensitive area though with more and more couples paying for their own weddings, both sets of parents contributing and with divorced and/or remarried parents. We say follow your heart here. If you and your fiance are paying for the wedding, but you like the tradition of listing the bride’s {and/or groom’s} parents first, then do it!

The second element of the Invitation Line is the actual invitation or call to action. Just after the listing of the hosts, you’ll want to include “request the pleasure of your company at the marriage of …” or “invite you to celebrate the marriage of …”. We say go with the version that you like best, but keep in mind that traditionally “honor” or “honour” used in this line {ie. the honor of your presence at the marriage of …} is reserved for church ceremonies.

For inspiration, take a look through the many different ways we have worded traditional invitations with our Search by Style feature. Below are a few examples and highlights!

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This sweet variation of our Sonoma wedding invitation suite {featuring a blush, apricot and pearl foil color palette!} shows a great example of traditional wording with the bride’s mother hosting the wedding.

Larkspur Letterpress Foil Design Invitation

This version of our Larkspur wedding suite includes a classic layout with the bride’s mother and father both mentioned, but the shift to using the more casual “invite you to celebrate” lightens the mood a little bit.

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Our Broadmoor invitation displays a classic example of traditional wording with the bride’s parents listed and the use of “honour” indicates that this is a formal affair with the ceremony taking place in a church.

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We love the way this couple decided to word their invitation! What a great way to honor the parents of both the bride and groom. The layout on this customization of our Occidental design could also work well for divorced parents.

We’re excited to be kicking off this series and we hope that you find it a valuable resource! We have many more tips and visual eye candy to help you design the ideal invitation for your event.

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Now you’re ready for Part Two, Modern wedding invitation wording!

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